All posts filed under: Create.

marbled leather.

My last class (😭) at Craftcation was leather marbled keychains, and it just so happened to be taught by Sadye Harvey of Temerity who teaches at Makers Mess. I attended her marbling night craft happy hour earlier this year and loved it, so I was excited attend another one of her classes.   We used a lot of tools and materials for this project. Vegetable-tanned leather Trays Water Carageenan (a thickener) Acrylic dye (for leather) Paintbrushes Alum (a mordant) Resolene (a dye sealant) Foam brushes Precision knife or scissors Ruler Leather punch Rivet and rivet press anvil Mallet Key rings First, we cut out leather shapes. For shapes with a straight edge, I used a precision knife and ruler. For other shapes, I made a soft outline with a skewer stick and then cut with a precision knife. For anything that would become a keychain, we made sure to include a 2-inch tail at the top of our designs so they could be attached onto the key rings. We punched holes using a leather punch. …

screen printing.

You thought I was done posting about Craftcation classes? MUHAHAHA, nevarrr! Seriously though, I learned so many things! Screen printing was one of the craft workshops Hubby picked out for me. He thought it would be a useful skill for business gear or for making tennis team shirts! The screen printing workshop was taught by Jenny Kraten. She taught us how to DIY a screen and gave us some insider tips on how to create a more sturdy set up later on. I’m really into it, but I’ll need an expanded craft budget. I would go crazy picking out paint colors alone! We made small screens in class using simple materials: cardboard, precision knife, ruler, pencil, mesh, and spray adhesive. The screen has a 1″ border and the mesh was pulled taut across the frame in all directions, making sure there were no wavy bits. For a stencil, I created a triangle pattern (easy to cut!). We used paper that was waxy on one side and dull on the other, cutting out patterns on the …

all the crafts!

There were so many classes to choose from at Craftcation – over 50 for each day! Most required pre-registration, but there were others that were drop-in and you could also get waitlisted for classes, too. Here are a few I got to take on a whim! Each day there were casual crafts set up poolside – what a lovely setting! They were less structured and more open play; you could stay for as little or as long as you wanted. I taught one of these casual sessions (my mini succulent terrarium craft) and attended two others: terrazzo jewelry (above) with Jennifer Perkins and fabric dye coloring pages (below) with friend roomie Rebecca! I don’t play with clay much so it was fun to learn a trendy technique – I would love to create some clay beads and charms to use in my pomtass crafts. For fabric coloring, we used rainbow patches and Jacquard liquid color. I’m thinking I’ll make a mini plushie with my rainbow patch. After teaching back-to-back classes, I still wanted to make …

ice dyeing.

What’s fun about Craftcation is that they bring makers together from all over. That means crafty knowledge and expertise abounds and you get to take all kinds of crafty workshops. My super talented friend roomie Rebecca taught a number of dyeing workshops and I got to join her for one of her ice dyeing classes. Ice dyeing is so magical! Rebecca gave an overview of the chemistry and art of ice dyeing and provided a demo. She had lots of samples, too, for inspiration, and she even made recipe cards if you wanted to work with specific color combos. This was helpful in trying to narrow down what colors to use (because I wanted to use them all!). We each dyed a bandana and a pair of socks. Similar to shibori dyeing, you can manipulate your fabric with folds or ties; you can also simply crinkle your fabric or leave them flat. The ice does lots of magic as it melts. The water travels and moves the colors throughout the fabric. First, we prepared the …

i made shooz.

I have so many more Craftcation stories to share with you! Instead of starting from the top, I’ll start from the bottom – I made shoes, espadrilles to be more precise.  This sewing class with Melissa Quaal of A Happy Stitch was my first class at Craftcation. After a road trip through Ojai, I checked into the Craftcation hotel, grabbed my conference badge, ran back and forth to the car and my hotel room to unload all the crafty goodies, and headed straight to class. Ready! Melissa made the cutest craft kits and goody bags for us. Even the tag with our shoe size was adorable. I had only worked with a sewing pattern once before so I was excited that I got into this sewing class to get more practice in (with adult supervision!). Melissa walked us through each step of the process, sharing all of her sewing secrets, too – like how to cut fabric with weights and a rotary cutter (I’m so impressed!). I was too scared to cut this way for …

sunny side up eggs.

Ok, now this is just silly. Sunny side up eggs for an Easter morning breakfast egg hunt. How cute would these be as Easter brunch table scatter? All you need for this craft are yellow plastic eggs, white felt, and scissors. Glue is optional. Open up the plastic eggs and cut off a piece of felt to fit the “yolk.” Cut a squiggly circle-like shape for the egg white. Press the half egg onto the felt to “stamp” on the circle shape. Fold the felt in half to cut a slit in the felt. Cut out the middle circle using the impression as a guide. It doesn’t have to be a perfect circle, but try to stay within the circle outline (if you cut around the circle the egg white might not stay securely on the egg yolk). Insert the “egg yolk,” fill with treats, and close. Sunny side up! Happy early Easter! And happy Easter breakfasting/brunching!  More Easter egg ideas here, here, here, and here.

pineapple eggs.

Here’s another Easter egg decor idea. You can use a similar concept as my cactus eggs to create pineapple eggs. Materials: Plastic eggs in shades of yellow (you can also spray paint your eggs) Permanent marker in brown or gold Felt in shades of green Hot glue Scissors How to: Create pineapple crowns with felt. Start with a rectangular piece of felt, ~2” tall by 4” long. A longer piece will result in more leaves. Cut out triangles from one side to form a zig zag pattern. Roll and glue to seal. Hot glue pineapple crowns to the tops of eggs. If you don’t like the positioning of the crown, allow the glue to cool completely, pull off the crown, reposition and re-glue. Draw ‘v’ shapes with marker to resemble a pineapple pattern. Allow to dry. Separate the crown leaves for more volume. Then fill with sweet treats and gift. Hurry, name the best pineapple you’ve ever had! Mine is Maui Gold ‘imported’ from Hawaii! Juuiiiicy…. There’s one more Easter egg post comin’ soon!