All posts tagged: macrame

macrame basics.

Use these knots and techniques to create unique designs for your macrame pieces. Lark’s Head Knot The lark’s head knot is often used as an anchoring knot to start your piece. Fold rope cord in half. Place the midpoint underneath the dowel in a U fashion. Bring the top loose rope strands over the dowel and through the U. Pull loose rope strands all the way through to tighten the knot. Square Knot To create a square knot, work four cords at a time. Using the first four rope cords, place rope cord 1 over cords 2 and 3. Place rope cord 4 over rope cord 1, under rope cords 3 and 2, and through the loop made by rope cord 1. Pull rope cords 1 and 4 out and up to create the first half of the square knot. To complete the square knot, perform a similar but opposite pattern. Place the now rope cord 4 over cords 3 and 2. Place rope cord 1 over rope cord 4, under rope cord 2 and 3, and through the loop …

plant people.

No more surface area for plants? Hang them! Here’s an easy macrame plant holder you can whip out in 30 minutes or less. This recipe creates a plant holder for 4-7 inch plant pot, up to 6-8 inches tall. For this project, you will need: 67 feet of 5mm rope, cut into: 6 10-foot pieces 1 3-foot piece 1 4-foot piece 2-3 inch hoop (metal, wood – your choice) Scissors S hook Somewhere to hang your project as you work Knots used (knot reference): Finishing knot Overhand knot Square knot How to: Hang your project using an S hook. Find the midpoint of the 6 10-foot pieces and hang on the ring. Using the 3-foot cord, create a finishing knot to gather the 6 10-foot pieces of rope. Working in cord pairs, create overhand knots approximately 4 inches from the bottom of the finishing knot. You will end up with 6 overhand knots. Working in groups of four, create 3 square knots approximately 3 inches from the bottom of the overhand knots. You will end …

macrame tree.

I did it! I made a macrame tree. I was inspired by the macrame landscape piece I recently created. I planned a pattern based on the landscape project. I had a rough idea of how I would create the tree gradient, but I totally winged it because I wasn’t sure how much cord to use for each column. I eventually figured out that each square knot would need about 7-8″ of cord (when using 4mm cord). Even if you run out though, you can use multiple pieces of the same color cord to complete the column. Materials: 1 12″ dowel 18 strands of 22″ natural cord (for the base) 9 strands of natural cord in varying lengths for the “background” (see below recipe for lengths) 9 strands of green cord in varying lengths for the tree (see below recipe for lengths) 3 strands of 24” brown/copper cord for tree trunk 1 strand 18″ natural cord (for the hanging string) Yellow felt (for star) Sewing needles Sewing thread Battery operated string of lights (optional) Fabric scissors …

macrame landscape.

I worked on a fun thing! I recently subscribed to The Crafter’s Box and the macrame landscape kit was my first project. This project was taught by Rachel Breuklander of the Lark’s Head. The kit came with everything we needed for the landscape project, including a pattern, a video tutorial, and even a really nice pair of scissors. I didn’t have to pull anything else out other than my macrame stand so I could work on my project while it hung. The color palette was so dreamy. They had a few additional color palettes to choose from if you wanted to create more than one project. After cutting all my rope to size, the pattern called for lark’s head knots and square knots. This was a fairly easy to follow project; it’s also a really good project to practice your square knot tension. I’ve done many a lark’s head and square knot, but I had never worked with the technique of changing the rope color to create a design. It’s so cool! Now that I …

chunky macrame.

With Fall in full swing, I thought it would be appropriate to bring out the cozy and fluffy macrame! This would make great wall decor for a small space. All you need: 32 feet of fluffy roving, cut into two 16-foot pieces 3.5 inch dowel 2 feet of twine or similar cord A ruler or tape measure Scissors First, prepare the dowel with a hanging cord. You want the hanging cord to be secure first because the fluffy roving might ‘push’ the cord out of place. Tie a double knot, wind the cord a few times around the dowel, tie another double knot. Create an arch for hanging and repeat the same knot, wrap, knot technique on the other side. Next, we will anchor the two 16-foot pieces of roving onto the dowel with Lark’s head knots. Fold one piece of roving so that the outer tail is ~11 feet and the inner tail is ~5 feet in length. Place the ‘fold’ under the dowel. Place the two loose tails under the hanging cord, over …

summer craft camp.

As a kid, I don’t recall going to summer camp, so I created my own! This week I hosted my first Summer Craft Camp via my craft biz. We focused on macramé and created three projects: feathers, trivets, and plant hangers. I also made limited edition Summer Craft Camp pennants (as seen in the cover photo). So excite! First up was macramé feathers! I saw these trending on the interwebs a while back and was determined to figure out the perfect recipe to create the fluffy feathered look. This has been on my teaching wishlist for a while now, and I’m happy I finally got to share! Why it brings so much delight, I’m not quite sure, but they make for lovely wall hangings. You can find my complete macramé feathers tutorial here. Then, macramé trivets! I wanted to create a project that was beautiful but also functional and came up with this trivet design, made completely of square knots. I love them so much they might end up in all my Christmas gift bags …

macraweave.

I created this macrame piece for Craftcation 2020; my friend Rebecca and I were going to host a community weaving project and use this as the base for the weaving. But Craftcation was cancelled, so I continued the weaving on my own. For the macrame base I used a 3 foot dowel and 48 strands of 12-foot rope, plus more for hanging. From top to bottom, I included Lark’s head knots, square knots, double half hitch knots, ‘loops,’ and finishing knots. Check out my fiber arts station – it’s a bike rack. 🙂 For the weaving I stuck with using roving and super thick yarn so it would fill in the gaps nicely. First mustard, then some white, then lots of earthy colors leftover from my soap felting project. And then I filled in the rest with white. I used variations on tabby stitches and soumak weave. Since this project was quite large and I wasn’t working in straight lines, I found it best to work in sections. Also, the roving is delicate and passing …

tiny pots.

Sometimes I see a craft supply and I’m like I have no idea what I’m going to make with this, but I need to make something with this and then I buy it. Sometimes I buy three of it. This time around I spotted tiny pots and I made tiny macrame plant holders! For this project you will need: tiny pots, non-stretchy cord, scissors, and plants. I used handmade felt flowers, but you can use real plants, too. Cut three pieces of cord three feet in length. Fold all three pieces in half and tie an overhand knot. Pull on each individual string to tighten the knot. You should have six strands. Next, we’ll work with cord pairs. Tie an overhand knot with each cord pair at least five inches down from the initial knot. Then tie an overhand knot with the right cord from the first pair and the left cord from the second pair, another with the right cord from the second pair and the left cord from the third pair, and another …

cinnamon.

Cinnamon crafts for the holi-yays! I was inspired to create himmeli with cinnamon sticks for Christmas so I ordered a bunch from San Francisco Herb company. They turned out pretty good and smell great! They require cinnamon sticks that are tubes and not all of the sticks were tubes, so I had lots of extra sticks. What to do? More crafts, of course! Himmeli plus additional ideas below. Himmeli. I usually make himmeli with paper straws; cinnamon sticks are much more festive for the Christmas season. You will need: 12 cinnamon sticks (that are tubes) Nylon cord or similar non-stretchy cord (the length of 15 sticks, plus an additional 1 foot) Craft needles Fabric scissors Bells or other decor (optional) String on 3 cinnamon sticks, leaving a short tail on one end (at least 3 inches). Tie a knot to form a triangle. Add 2 more sticks to form a second triangle; tie a knot. Continue to add two sticks at a time until you have 1 stick left; string on last stick. Bring the …

hoops.

Every month Modern Macrame hosts a knot along; I participated in July’s Knot Along: the Circle Game. For this project I used 11 inch and 3 inch hoops and 4 mm cotton string. Modern Macrame provides the pattern for free with purchase of all the supplies. Sweet! One bundle of rope creates one 11 inch project and part of a 3 inch project. It was fun to mix the colors, too. I purchased a few extra hoops in case I wanted to make more, and I totes did. This was a simple project (easy to follow!) and it was great for practicing horizontal double half hitch knots. The cotton string fringes easily, too, with just a comb. Check all the projects from this Knot Along on Instagram with #mmknotalong4. Some people turned them into plate chargers and table decor. I’m thinking these would look nice on a circular mirror. (Gift idea!) I’ll definitely be crafting along more with Modern Macrame. I want to get my macrame game strong and work on more rope projects.