All posts filed under: Handmade

a weaving rainbow.

My friend Vilasinee of the Loome came out with a few new maker tools, including a rainbow loom! Ka-yoot. I was very excited to try it out. For this craft you will need: Rainbow Loome tool Non stretchy cord Assorted yarn Felt Fabric or hot glue Fabric scissors Crafting needle The complete details can be found in V’s super helpful how-to video using the larger of the two rainbow looms, but in general: Use the non stretchy cord to set up your loom (this is called the warp). Weave a rainbow using a basic/tabby stitch (this is the weft). V recommends starting your weave at the top of the rainbow; I agree. This helps with achieving a more defined arch shape. Once you fill in the open arch shape, remove the rainbow from the loom. Untie the knots made in the warp, then remove the warp from the notches, one at a time. Alternate pulling the loose warp cord to secure the weft. I started from the middle and worked outward. Sew loose weft and …

giant pompom.

I had so much yarn (there’s still a lot!) so I made a giant pompom! Materials: All the yarn – scraps work great for this project 2 cake circles – go big! (You can also start with a big piece of cardboard and cut out your circle size of choice.) Rope, 3 feet in length Pencil Scissors (for cutting cardboard and for cutting yarn) Draw and cut a slit and a ~5 inch circle in both cake circles. You can use the hole from the first cake circle as a stencil for the second. Line up the two cake circles and begin wrapping with yarn. Continue to wrap until you can no longer pass yarn through the center. This took me 4+ hours. Cut open the yarn wraps along the cake circle circumference to expose the cake circles. Place the rope in between the two cake circle layers. Tie a tight double knot. Carefully remove the cake circles one at a time. It’s ok if you bend or even rip apart the circles to remove. …

more baskets.

My basket instructor hosted her annual art pop-up in her home studio last month. The sales from this pop-up were 100% donated to Yes We Can, a program that provides mobile classrooms for migrant kids waiting at the US-Mexico border. Each year she showcases her basket creations and jewelry, and baskets and felted creations by Guatemalan artisans she has worked with on previous projects. Also at the pop-up were two guest artists: one creates ceramic pieces and the other was painting on-the-spot custom portraits. I snagged a couple of basket beauties for my collection. Thank you to Michele for creating and teaching how to make brilliant pieces of basket art and for sharing your talents to help benefit those in need! More caring and sharing all around in 2020!

winter wreath.

Happy first day of winter! To celebrate, I’m sharing a winter wreath I created in Haia Sophia’s most recent wreath workshop at Rare Bird. Haia reviewed materials and basic wreath construction. We used 12-inch metal hoops, 24 gauge floral wire, and an assortment of foliage – some fresh and some dried. It was pokey class so we wore gardening gloves. It was so fun working with all the materials – acacia, fir, straw flowers, pinecones, …; it smelled so fresh in the classroom. Haia helped me create my dream giant wreath! It might be a little too big for my front door, but I love it! Thank you to our winter wreath guide Haia of Canopy Floral – check out her amazing work! Do you adorn your home with winter wreaths? Share your favorite door decor below!

sj made – again!

This year at the SJ Made Holiday Faire was my fourth time in attendance, and I realized I have been a part of the event since it’s inception. Very cool. I was assigned the same booth as last year – front and center! This time I brought lots of workshop samples including weavings and I co-hosted a coloring station with my booth neighbor / craft friend Rebecca of Oodlebadoodle. She also brought Awreatha for her final performance. Rebecca printed off some coloring pages from our SF Etsy team coloring book, including the one of my face. In this rendition, I am so extra. This year was the biggest year yet for the holiday show with almost (or maybe over!) 300 vendors. We took up nearly the entire hall space. There were also lots of activities and community groups offering interactive experiences. On Sunday, the local kitten adoption group brought kittens for 15-minute play sessions. I made sure to get a glimpse before the show started. Per usual, there is so much to see. The hall …

hoop, hoop, hoop. merry christmas!

Work holiday party time! I set up an embroidery hoop ornament station for the occasion. It’s a super easy craft, but looks polished in the embroidery hoop! For work events I’m always looking for activities that don’t require hot glue or much equipment, that are self explanatory, and that people can make in 10-15 minutes. This one was perfect! Here are some co-worker creations: You can make your own! For this craft you will need: Embroidery hoops, 3-5 inches in diameter Yarn Cord or twine Glue dots (I used permanent Glue Dots) Green card stock Red pompoms Mini brush bottle trees Other assorted decorations like mini reindeer and bells Scissors (for paper and fabric) Separate the hoop. Measure out pieces of yarn to fit over the inner hoop. Attach the outer hoop. Tighten the hoop as you pull the yarn taut. Trim excess yarn. Next, attach leaves, mini trees, and other decor with Glue Dots. You can also hang bells or other ornaments onto your hoop. More ideas: wrap the inner hoop with twine or …

felted necklace.

I had leftover felt pompoms from my Awreatha project so I decided to make pompom necklaces for gifting! This is a fun and easy DIY to add to your holiday make list. You will need: felt pompoms (I used 1″ poms) beading wire (at least double the length of your felt pom pom row) sewing needle chain (at least 20″ per project so it fits over people’s heads without needing a clasp opening) crimp beads (2 per project) wire cutters scissors crimping pliers Line up your felt pompom design. Measure out two pompom design lengths of beading wire. Begin threading your pompoms, leaving even tails on both ends. Cut 20-24 inches of coordinating chain. Thread bead wire through a crimp bead, through the last chain link, then back through the crimp bead. Crimp the crimp bead to secure the wire. Sew the bead wire tail through the first pompom then trim. For the other side, thread bead wire through crimp bead, through other end chain link (make sure the chain isn’t tangled), then back through …