All posts filed under: Handmade

more felt goodies.

I’ve been keeping busy making a few custom felt goodies! Floral Clip This design was greatly inspired by my hula days and all of the colorful floral clips I got to wear during my performances. My friend Tiffany ordered a custom clip for her lil one. I hadn’t made these in a while so it was nice to revisit this design. And, fun news – I’m planning to turn this into a DIY kit so you can make your own anytime, anywhere! Stay tuned. Better Late Than Ugly Another crafty lady friend, Sarah, ordered a custom wall hanging to add to her Feed the Fish co collection. Keke, this is perfect for any vanity! I like receiving requests for custom wall hangings. There’s a lot more room on the wall hangings versus the pennants so people get super creative! Sister District Marin Felt Suite One of my repeat customers works for a local democratic political organization and she wanted some Feed the Fish co flair for her group gatherings. She ordered a garland for use …

weave along.

This past weekend I hosted my first workshop on the interwebs (on Instagram!), and it was so cool because people actually joined me and crafted along! It was a free class, but I sold weaving kits complete with Crafterateur loom and assorted yarn for those who needed materials. Class was two and a half hours. I demonstrated a weaving from start (setting up the loom) to finish (adding a stick and hanging), and shared tips and tricks along the way. I also took questions as much as I could, but it was definitely a different experience not being able to see my students during class. Here’s the piece I worked on, plus some of the weaving stitches and techniques I shared. And here are some of the in-progress and finished works from makers across the state and nation! Tap through for weaving/photo credits; I’ve tagged all the makers’ Instagram handles. Thank you to everyone who joined my first online workshop! As a bonus I’ve recorded a few low-budget videos so you can craft along, too. …

macraweave.

I created this macrame piece for Craftcation 2020; my friend Rebecca and I were going to host a community weaving project and use this as the base for the weaving. But Craftcation was cancelled, so I continued the weaving on my own. For the macrame base I used a 3 foot dowel and 48 strands of 12-foot rope, plus more for hanging. From top to bottom, I included Lark’s head knots, square knots, double half hitch knots, ‘loops,’ and finishing knots. Check out my fiber arts station – it’s a bike rack. 🙂 For the weaving I stuck with using roving and super thick yarn so it would fill in the gaps nicely. First mustard, then some white, then lots of earthy colors leftover from my soap felting project. And then I filled in the rest with white. I used variations on tabby stitches and soumak weave. Since this project was quite large and I wasn’t working in straight lines, I found it best to work in sections. Also, the roving is delicate and passing …

egg hunt: zinnias.

Here’s my last Easter egg design for the year! Complete your plant trio with zinnia Easter eggs. For this craft you will need: Plastic eggs Felt in colors of choice (I went with warm tones) Fabric scissors Hot glue Unlike the last two in this egg series, this flower requires strips of petals. Cut out 3-6 strips (the more you use, the fuller your flower!). For the center, cut fringe into two small rectangular pieces of felt. Roll the inner piece and seal with hot glue. Roll and glue the outer piece onto the inner piece. Glue to the top of the egg. Glue the petal strips onto the egg. Wrap each row with two layers of petals to get a fuller flower. Glue petals first to the top half of the egg. Then glue petals to the bottom half of the egg. Make sure petals don’t get attached to both the top and bottom halves of the egg so you can still open it. I like to keep the base bare so the flower …

make it pretty.

On my last visit home my Mommy set aside some broken jewelry to be fixed. She usually packs them all in a baggy with a note that says broken or Can you fix these? It’s basically become tradition for me to take a container of broken jewelry home for fixing. I use my the Bead Smith tray to keep all the beads in place as I create pieces. Sometimes I can fix the pieces to look like the original jewelry; sometimes she let’s me get creative and I add some beads from my current stash. Here’s what I’ve been working on. I love creating long necklaces to showcase beads. I’m not super confident in working with stretchy jewelry (I feel like I can’t get the knots right to be secure.), so I prefer working with beading wire. My current favorite is Soft Flex brand which I use in all my necklaces. For all of these necklaces I’ve combined some of my Mommy’s jewelry with my bead stash. She has a broad collection of jewelry so …

egg hunt: succulents.

I’m sticking with a plant theme for this year’s egg hunt (Did you catch the first one?). Egg #2 for 2020 is a succulent Easter egg! You might remember my cactus eggs from last year; this one is a total felt upgrade! For this craft you will need: Plastic eggs Felt in succulent colors, plus flower colors of choice Fabric scissors Hot glue Cut out succulent leaves. I like to cut out rectangles and cut the shape out two at a time. Succulent leaves can take on any shape; I went with teardrops in different sizes. You will need between 18-30 leaves for each egg, depending on how many rows of leaves you want, and how far apart you space each leaf. For a fuller succulent, use more leaves. Begin glueing on the smaller leaves to the top of the egg, and work your way to the larger leaves. Add hot glue to the bottom of a leaf and attach to the egg. Create one row of leaves around the egg by overlapping leaves. Add …

punch.

Ok, don’t laugh. I attempted punch needle on my own and this is all I could come up with. Ha! Here’s my experience plus some lessons learned. I purchased a supply kit from Jenny Lemons. It came with yarn and monks cloth. I also purchased a #10 Oxford punch needle. I thought I could use a basic embroidery hoop for this project – it worked, but the monks cloth kept slipping. Lesson 1: I must learn to stretch monks cloth like an artist canvas so the monks cloth will stay in place as I punch. Lesson 2: It helps if you have a pattern in mind. I didn’t. I just punched! The punching itself is pretty satisfying and the technique can be easily mastered with practice. The Oxford punch comes with helpful tips, too, so take a look at the manual. Given my yarn color combo I was going for something Earth-y / planet-y. Perhaps it was achieved, but next time I would definitely pick a pattern or draw a design on the monks cloth …