All posts filed under: Guided Crafts

egg hunt: succulents.

I’m sticking with a plant theme for this year’s egg hunt (Did you catch the first one?). Egg #2 for 2020 is a succulent Easter egg! You might remember my cactus eggs from last year; this one is a total felt upgrade! For this craft you will need: Plastic eggs Felt in succulent colors, plus flower colors of choice Fabric scissors Hot glue Cut out succulent leaves. I like to cut out rectangles and cut the shape out two at a time. Succulent leaves can take on any shape; I went with teardrops in different sizes. You will need between 18-30 leaves for each egg, depending on how many rows of leaves you want, and how far apart you space each leaf. For a fuller succulent, use more leaves. Begin glueing on the smaller leaves to the top of the egg, and work your way to the larger leaves. Add hot glue to the bottom of a leaf and attach to the egg. Create one row of leaves around the egg by overlapping leaves. Add …

egg hunt: roses.

Yay! You found the first of my hidden Easter egg crafts! For this Easter egg, I was going for tulips, but couldn’t get the petals to sit right on the shape of egg, so I went with more of a rose look, sans thorns. For this craft you will need: Plastic eggs Felt in rose colors of choice plus green Floral wire Fabric scissors Hot glue Pliers x2 (optional) Cut rose petal shapes; you’ll need between 12-18 petals for each egg, depending on the size of the egg and how far apart you decide to space your petals. Petals for each egg should be about the height of your eggs; they don’t need to be exactly the same size. Begin gluing petals to the top half of the egg with a little petal overhang onto the bottom half of the egg. Add a line of glue to the petal and attach to the egg. Make sure glue only touches the top half of the egg or else the egg will get glued shut. Keep adding …

tiny pots.

Sometimes I see a craft supply and I’m like I have no idea what I’m going to make with this, but I need to make something with this and then I buy it. Sometimes I buy three of it. This time around I spotted tiny pots and I made tiny macrame plant holders! For this project you will need: tiny pots, non-stretchy cord, scissors, and plants. I used handmade felt flowers, but you can use real plants, too. Cut three pieces of cord three feet in length. Fold all three pieces in half and tie an overhand knot. Pull on each individual string to tighten the knot. You should have six strands. Next, we’ll work with cord pairs. Tie an overhand knot with each cord pair at least five inches down from the initial knot. Then tie an overhand knot with the right cord from the first pair and the left cord from the second pair, another with the right cord from the second pair and the left cord from the third pair, and another …

leather tasselry.

After my last leather bag workshop I had lots of extra leather to play with so I made tassels! Here’s how. Materials: scrap leather, keyring, ruler, roller cutter, fabric scissors, self-healing mat, hot glue, bead (optional), ribbon (optional). Cut a rectangular piece of leather, any size; then cut fringe. Leave at least a finger’s width uncut at the top of the fringe. Cut out one strip of leather; this will be the part that anchors the tassel to the keyring so make sure it’s narrow enough to fit. Insert the strip of leather onto the keyring and attach strip to itself with a drop of hot glue. Add glue to the top of the tassel on the wrong side, and roll onto the keychain. Do this step slowly, adding glue little by little, in between rolls. Trim the anchor leather if it peeks out from the tassel. Done! More options: Try out different sizes, use ribbon instead of leather to serve as the tassel anchor, add a bead before glueing on the tassel, just add …

giant pompom.

I had so much yarn (there’s still a lot!) so I made a giant pompom! Materials: All the yarn – scraps work great for this project 2 cake circles – go big! (You can also start with a big piece of cardboard and cut out your circle size of choice.) Rope, 3 feet in length Pencil Scissors (for cutting cardboard and for cutting yarn) Draw and cut a slit and a ~5 inch circle in both cake circles. You can use the hole from the first cake circle as a stencil for the second. Line up the two cake circles and begin wrapping with yarn. Continue to wrap until you can no longer pass yarn through the center. This took me 4+ hours. Cut open the yarn wraps along the cake circle circumference to expose the cake circles. Place the rope in between the two cake circle layers. Tie a tight double knot. Carefully remove the cake circles one at a time. It’s ok if you bend or even rip apart the circles to remove. …

family crafts.

This year for Christmas Craft Camp, we decorated tiny trees and painted watercolor wreaths! Mini Tree Decorating. I recycled an activity from last year because I hadn’t yet shared it with my fam: mini brush bottle tree decorating! It’s the most adorable-ist. For this craft you will need: mini brush bottle trees beads beading wire or cord (I find wire works best) sewing needles felt or fabric (for a tree skirt) additional (optional) embellishments: sequins, bells, confetti The full “how I did it” on my previous mini tree post. Watercolor Wreaths. And since I’ve been wanting to practice my watercolor more : watercolor wreaths! For this project your will need: watercolors watercolor paper water brushes pencil paper cutter (optional) picture frame (optional) circle template – can use a bowl or cup (optional) If framing, cut watercolor paper down to appropriate size for your frame. Draw a circle in pencil. For this step you can trace a circular bowl or cup. Begin painting leaves using light shades. Work your way around the wreath with one type …

cinnamon.

Cinnamon crafts for the holi-yays! I was inspired to create himmeli with cinnamon sticks for Christmas so I ordered a bunch from San Francisco Herb company. They turned out pretty good and smell great! They require cinnamon sticks that are tubes and not all of the sticks were tubes, so I had lots of extra sticks. What to do? More crafts, of course! Himmeli plus additional ideas below. Himmeli. I usually make himmeli with paper straws; cinnamon sticks are much more festive for the Christmas season. You will need: 12 cinnamon sticks (that are tubes) Nylon cord or similar non-stretchy cord (the length of 15 sticks, plus an additional 1 foot) Craft needles Fabric scissors Bells or other decor (optional) String on 3 cinnamon sticks, leaving a short tail on one end (at least 3 inches). Tie a knot to form a triangle. Add 2 more sticks to form a second triangle; tie a knot. Continue to add two sticks at a time until you have 1 stick left; string on last stick. Bring the …