Author: Erin G.

sunburst basket.

I made the Flax and Twine / Modern Macrame sunburst basket project! My stitching isn’t the best (also, left hand problems ~ everything is backwards!), but I loved all aspects of this project. This project requires minimal materials: rope, twine, a tapestry needle, and scissors. I copied the sample colors because look how dreamy this brown rope is. The pattern comes with an accompanying video which I am a big fan of – it’s so much easier for me to follow a video versus written instructions when it’s my first time creating a project. When I shared my progress with my parents my Dad shared that my Great-Grandfather was a basket maker! OMG, it all makes sense now why I’m basket obsessed! It’s in my blood! My Great-Grandfather’s repertoire was vast with baskets ranging in size from tabletop baskets for displaying food to large works meant for storing rice. Goals! Here’s my finished piece. The sample was more of a plate-like shape; I went for more of a bowl since I like having containers for …

more places.

More outdoor spaces to explore in the East Bay! Because eight wasn’t enough. Keller Beach Park, Richmond / A small beach that’s worth the visit. If you’re like me, you’ll enjoy watching the resident squirrels find and munch on human snacks. San Pablo Park, Berkeley / There’s currently construction and upgrades happening at the park, but there’s a huge lawn area – perfect for setting up a socially distanced picnic and enjoying the sunshine. Willard Park, Berkeley / Aww, I used to live near Willard Park. I even had a crafty birthday party here one year. There’s a playground and lots of grassy areas. I’m particularly fond of their redwood trees. Strolling the neighborhood is lovely, too, because there are so many things blooming year-round. Point Pinole Regional Park Dotson Family Marsh, Richmond / The scenery is a bit dry, but I loved it here. An hour before sunset there wasn’t much of a crowd, and the trail is wide enough to stay a good distance away from folks going the opposite direction. There’s a …

mala.

Another Michaels workshop in the books. This time I created a mala necklace, or at least a necklace inspired by a mala necklace. Traditional mala necklaces have 108 beads, but I did the cheat way of creating this necklace and was a bit more freestyle with my beads. For the full tutorial and supply list see the online class and accompanying instructions. For my necklace I used: bipyramid beads 6mm beads a pendant assorted seed beads silk bead cord big eye beading needles (I ended up not needing these because my bead cord had an attached needle) pliers bead tweezers scissors Most of my beads came from local bead shop Blue Door Beads (During shelter in place I sent them a list and they shopped the store for me and shipped!). The pendant was from Michaels. I also used beads I acquired from craft swaps. My how to: I decided on a pattern and repeated the pattern four times for one side of the necklace, then mirrored the pattern on the other side of the …

macrame basics.

Use these knots and techniques to create unique designs for your macrame pieces. Lark’s Head Knot The lark’s head knot is often used as an anchoring knot to start your piece. Fold rope cord in half. Place the midpoint underneath the dowel in a U fashion. Bring the top loose rope strands over the dowel and through the U. Pull loose rope strands all the way through to tighten the knot. Square Knot To create a square knot, work four cords at a time. Using the first four rope cords, place rope cord 1 over cords 2 and 3. Place rope cord 4 over rope cord 1, under rope cords 3 and 2, and through the loop made by rope cord 1. Pull rope cords 1 and 4 out and up to create the first half of the square knot. To complete the square knot, perform a similar but opposite pattern. Place the now rope cord 4 over cords 3 and 2. Place rope cord 1 over rope cord 4, under rope cord 2 and 3, and through the loop …

plant people.

No more surface area for plants? Hang them! Here’s an easy macrame plant holder you can whip out in 30 minutes or less. This recipe creates a plant holder for 4-7 inch plant pot, up to 6-8 inches tall. For this project, you will need: 67 feet of 5mm rope, cut into: 6 10-foot pieces 1 3-foot piece 1 4-foot piece 2-3 inch hoop (metal, wood – your choice) Scissors S hook Somewhere to hang your project as you work Knots used (knot reference): Finishing knot Overhand knot Square knot How to: Hang your project using an S hook. Find the midpoint of the 6 10-foot pieces and hang on the ring. Using the 3-foot cord, create a finishing knot to gather the 6 10-foot pieces of rope. Working in cord pairs, create overhand knots approximately 4 inches from the bottom of the finishing knot. You will end up with 6 overhand knots. Working in groups of four, create 3 square knots approximately 3 inches from the bottom of the overhand knots. You will end …

reindeer.

Real talk – Santa scares me, but the reindeer are cool. Here’s a reindeer piñata idea for your Christmas celebrations. How cute would it be to create one for each of Santa’s reindeer? You will need: Cardboard Crepe streamers in reindeer colors (brown, creme, black, white) Paper in browns, black, and white Glue stick Scissors Pencil Paper scissors Masking tape or similar I used my burro template and reindeer-ified it with antlers and spots. Cut out two reindeer shapes plus strips of cardboard 2 inches in width for the perimeter. Make sure you can bend the cardboard into curvy shapes (corrugation should run across the 2 inch width). Decide where you want to place the piñata opening and start wrapping one of the shapes with the cardboard strips above the flap. Use tape to attach strips to shapes. Continue to work around the piñata until you reach the flap opening. Attach the second shape to the opposite side. Since we’re not popping this piñata open, I used packing tape to make it extra secure. Add …

christmas hello.

Something I haven’t done in a few years because I pack my November/December with craft events and I wait until it’s too late to make it happen: creating and sending Christmas cards! I used to do it every year. These cards are four years in the making. I will now be sending Christmas cards every leap year…maybe. This year’s Christmas card timeline: Year 1: Buy the paper Year 2: Cut the paper Year 3: Assemble the paper Year 4: Write messages on the paper, address envelopes, and mail! Here’s what I used to make my cards: 12″ x 12″ double sided card stock 12″ x 12″ white card stock Twine Embellishments (I cut out reindeer images) Envelopes Paper cutter Scissors (for fabric and for paper) Bone folder Double sided foam adhesive Someone once described my cards as little booklets. I like to use 12″ x 12″ double sided cardstock (get the good heavyweight stuff!) for all of my handmade cards. They divide up into three 4″ x 6″ cards (cut two 8″ x 6″ pieces …

christmas gift packs.

You know me – I love creating gift packs! Here’s a gift pack idea for Christmas. Gather: baskets, shredded paper filling, and locally sourced treats. What’s great about giving gifts in baskets is that the recipient can either use the basket in their home or reuse the basket to give a gift to someone else. I had a few red baskets that I was previously using for craft events but was ready to give away. Here are some tasty items I found locally! Siren protein snacks made in San Francisco. These are plant based, gluten-free, and non-GMO. Covered almonds by Feve Chocolates, also made in San Francisco. They give 5% of their profit in micro-loans to cocoa farmers. Hubby and I picked up an extra pack of the chai spiced almonds for ourselves – yum! Jamnation jams are so delightful and punny. They were my booth neighbors at the SF Etsy Indie Holiday Emporium last year and they let me try all the flavors. Wineforest Wild Foods rubs from Napa. Don’t the flavors sound exciting! …

lavender.

Here’s a cute, easy, and smelly in a good way DIY for the holiYAYs: lavender sachets with a Christmas twist. For this craft you will need: Lavender buds – I ordered lavender from San Francisco Herb Co (a local favorite!). Upon opening the bag I felt instant relaxation vibes. Cotton sachets – Find them at your local craft store. Spoon or funnel Letter stamps – I used Mine Stamp to label my sachets. This is a great labeler for all fabric items. There is room to include up to three lines of text and also a built-in ink pad! Alternatively, you can use individual letter stamps. Fabric ink Stamp a bunch of sachets, fill with lavender, and tie. To make it festive for Christmas I labeled sachets with “You’re Nice / Not Coal.” Don’t they look like little gift sacks? I originally wanted to create lavender sachets as a natural silverfish repellent (gross!), but then I found more uses for them! In general, they smell nice so having a sachet handy for smelly occasions (like …

holiday macarons.

Raising Bebe is no walk in the park, but he slept long enough for me to enjoy a little macaron decorating session with my Yelp Elite Squad and Macarons by Natalie. Remember when I decorated boba and dumpling macarons? This time we enjoyed decorating a few holiday designs in Hello Kitty, Baymax, and corgi shapes. Like last time, we picked up our kits from Macarons by Natalie headquarters. Each kit came with macaron shells for a dozen cookies, three types of filling (red velvet, peppermint mocha, and snickerdoodle), assorted icing (red, yellow, green, and white), sprinkles, and a food marker. For the event, we donned our best ugly holiday sweaters and holiday hats, and Natalie demoed a few macaron decor ideas for each character. I tried to create Hello Kitty Santa… Tahdah! All the macarons! Almost too cute to eat! This was such a fun event, and technically my first holiday party of the season! In my world it barely feels like December, so this was a nice reminder that Christmas is coming! 🙂 Are …